Monday, August 19, 2019

Book Reviews - 3 of 4 Reads Exceed Expectations!

For this round of reads, I'd say all of these books have had some kind of "hype" around them. Is a hype still a thing people talk about? I don't know anymore. Anyway. For 75% of these, the hype it received not only met or exceeded how I thought it'd go. For one, I just was a little unsure of how I felt. With that, here's the latest quartet of books in my life.



Stay Sexy and Don't Get Murdered: The Definitive How-To Guide by Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark was so, so different than what I thought it was going to be - in a good way. While I regularly listen to the My Favorite Murder podcast, I somehow missed ever hearing what this book was actually about. Anyway, this isn't a review about me. This is more Karen and Georgia's memoir. It is a real and authentic exploration of the experiences in their lives that made them who they are. It is honest and emotional in a way that I loved. What I also loved was that it wasn't just them sharing these experiences, but it was also connected to how it shaped their lives, what they learned, and even how it relates to who they are now. While this wasn't about the podcast, it also was about the podcast. It was about how they found their way to each other, as well as why they have chosen to focus on the topic they have. I would absolutely categorize this as a memoir, but I would also say this is a guide to self care. They have such a unique way in which they tell their stories that is so relatable. I would have guessed I would love this one, but I also found I took so much more from it than I anticipated!

Read this book if - You're a murderino/MFM fan. You want something that's got some really great self care advice.

The Dinner List by Rebecca Serle was such an intriguing premise. Sabrina shows up for her thirtieth birthday dinner. This seems pretty standard fare except when she sees who's showed up. Seated at the table are five people Sabrina had chosen when the question was posed, "If you could have dinner with anyone dead or alive, who would you choose?" It seems like a dream, but Sabrina goes with it. Throughout the evening, you learn why Sabrina has chosen each person, what their history has been, and where their relationship is now. The story is told through the dinner, but also in flashbacks in Sabrina's life. This one was such an interesting story. First of all, it made me consider who I would put at my own table. Second, I loved how the dinner told Sabrina's story. There were big moments and little moments with each of the characters, and it wove a story that kept me captivated. I also found I was quite wrapped up in the emotion of Sabrina's story, particularly with some of the reveals that went down later in the story. I appreciate a book that wraps you up in its characters, but also how it makes you think about your own, and this was so much of that.

Read this book if - You want a book that focuses on relationships. You like a book that takes a unique spin on something unexpected (but often considered) coming to fruition.

One Day in December by Josie Silver was a long and winding road of a love story. Laurie doesn't believe in love at first sight, and then she sees him. Gazing out the window of a bus, she sees a man waiting at the stop, and she feels an instant connection. She knows that he's the one, and she must find him. Well, she does eventually. Only problem? He's her best friend Sarah's boyfriend Jack. From there, the book chronicles the next decade of Jack and Laurie. Told from each of their points of view, it's about where they find love, where they get it wrong, and how they stay connected, as well as lose touch. What I loved was the twists in this story. While it was a love story, and there was a way I hoped/thought it might end, there was enough plot along the way to keep me invested throughout. With each year, there was more about where Laurie and Jack were at as both individuals and with their relationship, and I loved seeing the progression and added complexity. I really dug how this story had depth and twists, but at its core, it was all about love in a unique way.

Read this book if - You like love stories with some bumps along the way. You like stories grounded in people and relationships.

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green was something. . . I spent much of the book deciding if I really liked the book. The story revolves around the arrival of Carl statues around the globe - Imagine a bunch of Optimus Prime replicas, and that's what goes down. They show up unexplained one evening at a variety of locations, and April May and a friend film their interaction with one. Overnight (literally), April becomes an internet sensation as buzz about the Carls goes viral. Throughout the story, April navigates her newfound fame and perceived expertise, as everyone tries to figure out who the Carls are, what they mean, etc. I liked the pieces of the book that focused on how April tried to navigate being thrust into the spotlight and all that came with that experience. It was some intriguing commentary on how social media can accelerate a story and the role it plays in news and real life happenings today. Overall though, this wasn't one that totally captivated me. I kept reading because I wanted to know what was happening with the Carls. However, I wanted more character development and depth. I was more driven to know what was happening because of the mystery, and I wanted it to be because I was drawn into what was happening to the characters. This was an interesting enough read that kept me turning the pages, but wasn't fully and totally my jam. Thanks to NetGalley for letting me have a look at this one that's now available in paperback.

Read this book if - You want something that dabbles in science fiction while also being a commentary on the role of social media in our lives.

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