Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Book Reviews - Catching Up on the Future

I took this round of (e)reads to clear out some of my advanced copies that have been on my (virtual) shelf for a minute and/or awhile. Some of these will be out later, and some are already released because #toomanybookstoreadinmylifeprobs. Read on. . .

Ghoster by Jason Arnopp was a book I really liked for the first quarter. Kate meets Scott on a social media detox retreat, and they start a relationship. Things seem to be going well, and Kate and Scott are due to move in together. The day this is due to happen, Scott disappears. Kate is left with an empty apartment where she finds Scott's phone. She's sworn off social media due to her addiction, but she also knows this could have the answers of why she's been seemingly ghosted. So, that sounds like an intriguing premise, right? Well, that's where the focus starts. Then, the book just went all kind of directions, and it just didn't gel with me at all. I found myself doing lots of "Wait, what" and "Really?!? REALLY?!?!" as I read. I found I was then reading not so much because I was captivated, but I just wanted some resolution, and that took a minute given this one was nearly 500 pages. The premise of this one was really intriguing to me, but what actually went down was just so far from what I was hoping to get out of reading. Thanks to NetGalley for the early look in exchange for my (always) honest review.

Read this book if - You want something where literally nothing is at it seems - and then some.

The Peacock Detectives by Carly Nugent advertises itself as the story of Cassie whose trying to find out what happened to her neighbors' peacocks. Y'all, this is so, so, SO very much more than that. While this is how Cassie's story starts, it covers a great deal as she is navigating some complicated stuff. What especially resonated with me was the theme of mental health that was masterfully done. I loved the care and honesty that was given to this topic, as Cassie show struggles in others, while also managing some feels of her own. If you're looking for a book that could start a conversation on this topic, this could be it. Cassie is also navigating some tough family dynamics, bullying, and an ill grandparent. Each of these happenings are shown from Cassie's perspective which is powerful. Throughout she is working on her story, so she processes each development in real time, and y'all, again, it's just beautiful. I loved how authentic and real Cassie's story was. This one gave voice to stuff kids are definitely experiencing and can't always make sense of. Thanks to NetGalley for the early look at what I thought was going to a lighthearted book, but instead gave me so, so much more. 

Read this book if - You want a middle grade read that honestly explores the emotions around some real life tough stuff. You want a book to give voice to stuff that does happen to kids, but isn't always in books.

Like Nothing Amazing Ever Happened by Emily Blejwas was a beautiful story told through grief and trying to make sense of the middle school world. Justin's dad dies tragically, and it leaves Justin with so many questions and emotions. He misses his dad, while realizing there is so much he didn't know about him (but wants to), and finds he especially wants to know more about what happened on the last day of his life. Along with him, Justin's brother and mom are also navigating their new normal as a family of three. This is complicated as they are each grieving the loss and trying to figure out how to contribute to their household. Finally, Justin is a middle schooler, and with that, there's all the middle school things going down as he struggles to find his place and his people. He is particularly hesitant to engage in activities that remind him of his dad, and that is hard for others to understand. For a middle grade read, this packed an incredible amount of punch related to emotion. This is set against the Gulf War, and Justin's dad was also a veteran suffering from PTSD, and both of these things drive the plot and associated emotions in different ways. Thanks to NetGalley for the early look at this April 2020 release. This is one of those books that will stay with you in its feels and characters for sure.

Read this book if - You want a middle grade read with honest and raw emotion. You want a book that masterfully examines grief.

Best Friends Forever by Dawn Goodwin is a book about flawed characters and an extremely flawed friendship. This is one of those books where you just don't like the characters, and it's like reading an especially scandalous Lifetime movie. This the story of Anna and Vicky who have been, well, best friends forever. Anna has been tragically killed, and Vicky shows up at her house to help David, her husband, and two young children. However, David senses something is just not right with Vicky's insertion into their lives. The book goes back in time to show the evolution of Anna and Vicky's friendship, and there are heaping helpings of problematic dynamics and situations in that y'all. In real time, it is David trying to make sense of what happened to his wife, why Vicky has taken the role she has, and how the two might be related. I really like a plot that uses the past and the present to weave a story together, and this was very much that. This is also used to build more complete pictures of the characters, and that does mean lots of secrets and lies are revealed. I would also offer strong content warnings as there are instances of sexual assault, abuse, and very unhealthy relationships. Thanks to NetGalley for access to this read in exchange for my review.

Read this book if - You want something that is overflowing with lies and deceit?

Until next time!

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