Friday, October 18, 2019

Book Reviews - Heavy Reads

Whoa, y'all. I usually try to temper my reading, so I don't take on too much emotion. Well, with this, I took on so, so much. They were worth the feels, but goodness, these were a lot, especially given three of the four were real life stuff via memoirs!

Blood: A Memoir by Allison Moorer is a really, really emotional real - like off the charts y'all. As a teenager, Allison's mother is shot and killed by her father, and he then kills himself. Allison hears the gunshots, and she sees the aftermath. The memoir is her reflecting on what led her family to that point and where she goes from that day. The way the story is told is a bit choppy, but that works well because you see how the memory of her family comes back to her in pieces. Throughout she revisits what she remembers of her parents, and all that happened before that terrible day. This is a powerful read as she delves deep into places of her memory that are definitely painful, but also they are what she has left of her parents. This memoir is full of so much raw emotion. She's revisiting her childhood as an adult, and that takes many different directions. She's also able to tap into the parts that brought her joy, while still sharing what made it tough. Throughout, there is also a thread of resilience as you see all she has overcome. This is a beautifully written memoir that is also full of incredible tragedy. Thanks to Hachette Books for the advanced copy of this soon to be released read.

Read this book if - You want to read a memoir that explores the pain of a childhood as an adult, as well as finding resilience in tragedy.

Normal People by Sally Rooney was a read that was definitely different for me. I like books that use keep characters at the center of their plot. This is really characters above all else, and there wasn't really a moving plot I could latch onto because there was so much focus on the characters. The primary characters are Connell and Maryanne. As high schoolers, they form a relationship outside of school, but don't acknowledge that relationship during the school day. The book then traces their relationship through the years. With each interaction, where they each are is different, and they have to assess what that means for the other person and how they now connect - or don't. To me, this is a book that makes you ponder the question of if two people belong together. I have an answer for these people, but I don't want to reveal it here as it would ruin the plot. This is my book club's selection for the month, so I'm interested to hear how other people felt about the relationship. Overall though, this one just wasn't totally for me as I like to have more substance to the plot. 

Read this book if - You want a book that is entirely character driven. You like something that makes you consider questions and scenarios.

Soulman: The Rocky Johnson Story by Rocky Johnson was a book I went into knowing very little. I saw The Rock had written the foreword, and it wasn't until I started reading that I realized, "Oh, that would make sense because Rocky is his dad." Anyway, that's about me, not the book. This is the story of Rocky's career in professional wrestling. He started young, then worked n a variety of regional promotions through the years. Throughout, he paints a vivid picture of what the life of a wrestler was like back then, and it wasn't always easy. It was lots of grinding to get to the top, and that required a lot of travel which meant that he wasn't home a lot. He also speaks to what it was like to be one of the first black wrestlers. This impacted how he was treated, as well as how he was pushed in different promotions. Given all the bells and whistles that come with wrestling these days, I find it interesting to read about what it was like "back when," and it was especially interesting given Rocky's perspective. Throughout he paints a honest picture of his story. Sometimes that means he brings to light where he struggled, and that makes his story all the more real. I literally only read this because it was recommended to me by the publisher (thanks ECW Press), so it was a surprise to read such a well-told and interesting story about a wrestling legend. Thanks to NetGalley for the look at this recent release.

Read this book if - You want a historical look at pro wrestling. 

Unfollow: A Journey from Hatred to Hope by Megan Phelps-Roper is an incredibly intimate exploration of one women's complete transformation. Megan grew up in a church that is known for extreme hate under the guise of religion. Growing up in Topeka, I can remember Megan's former church's pickets at my church, at the mall, and at high school graduations. As a child, it was such a confusing experience, and as an adult, I appreciated the window she gave into the why (and not to justify, but to give insight into what they believed they were doing) of their behaviors as she goes through her own childhood. She does a masterful job that is at times hard to read given all the terrible and disgusting actions of the church. She also explores and acknowledges when she was on board for what the church was preaching, and then she she also shares how she started to question what she had been brought up in. Throughout, this is an emotional read, and there were times I found myself in tears as It read. It is emotional to see how many people the church has hurt in the name of their faith, to read about Megan's connections to her families and how these relationships change, to see the strength she found in leaving, and to learn of the unexpected connections she found when she needed them most. This was truly Megan's heart in a book. Throughout she has an incredible honesty, and she gives such detail to her story. I was so blown away by this memoir, and it's one that will definitely stay with me.

Read this book if - You want a memoir that truly shares one woman's journey. You want to look at how hate happens, but also how redemption can happen.

Onto the next ones!

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